Sample Paper on Types of Respiratory Care Delivered in Alternative Sites

Types of Respiratory Care Delivered in Alternative Sites

Bland Aerosol Therapy

Definition and Indication for Use 

Bland Aerosol Therapy (BAT) is a form of medication used to manage the upper airway inflammation from croup, epiglottitis, and post-extubation edema (Aarc, 2019). The administration of bland aerosol (BA) involves the injection of disinfected water or hypertonic, isotonic, or hypotonic saline in aerosol status.

Hazards 

The common hazards include wheezing, infections, patient discomfort, and constriction of the bronchus. Other risks entail over-hydration and exposure of the caregivers to droplet nuclei of microorganism generated during coughs.

Procedure for Set-up 

Numerous instruments can be used to generate aerosol during the bland aerosol therapy. The commonly used devices include large volume jet nebulizers and the ultrasonic nebulizers (Aarc, 2019). The caregiver then assembles the appliances which comprise of mist tent, mouthpiece, mask, hood, face tent, and T-piece.

Aerosol Drug Therapy

Definition and Indication for Use

Aerosol Therapy (AT) is a form of medical care used to manage breathing difficulties like asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) (Dhanani et al., 2016). The treatment eases the muscles in the airway to enhance breathing and help avert infections.

Hazards 

The principal hazard of ADT is the severe reaction to the treatment being directed, including infection to the client, airway reactivity, eye irritation, and possible drug concentration.

Procedure for Set-up 

The set-up for the therapy entails warming the pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI), assembling the devices for use while uncapping the mouthpiece and confirming that there is no loose item in the appliance (Myers, 2015). The mouthpiece is placed between the lips, and the caregiver ensures that the tongue is away from the outlet path.

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy (CPAP)

Definition and Indication for Use

Continuous positive airway therapy CPAP) is a form of medication used to treat patients experiencing sleep apnea and hypopnea (Pinto & Sharma, 2019). The primary function of CPAP is to keep the airway open by ensuring it does not collapse when a person breathes while asleep.

Hazards 

The notable CPAP hazards include nasal congestion and rhinitis while some patients have reported suffering from claustrophobia to the CPAP mask.

Procedure for Set-up 

The set-up for outpatients involves monitoring a patient in a sleep lab in which the optimal pressure is assessed by a technologist to reduce apnea (Pinto & Sharma, 2019). The caregiver assembles the equipment and places the face mask to cover both the nose and mouth.

Apnea Monitoring

Definition and Indication for Use 

Habitual snoring is one of the primary symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is a sleeping disorder affecting the majority of the U.S citizens. Apnea monitor (AM) is a gadget used to monitor breathing and heart rate when an individual is asleep (WHO, 2011). The indication for AM is to detect the breathing pattern, including the heart rate and the device alerts the caregiver by making a sound when the person’s heartbeat slows.

Hazards

Risks that might accrue from the use of AM include the production of electromagnetic fields by electric appliances that can cause false breath and heartbeat detection (WHO, 2011). Equally, the device may fail to alert the caregiver during an episode of a power blackout, thus, limiting its use.

Procedure for Set-up 

The AM is connected to the patient through the use of an appropriate sensor for the measurement purpose (WHO, 2011). Once attached, the unit monitors various body elements when the client breathes, and an alarming sound indicates that the patirnt’s heartbeat has slowed.

 

 

References

Aarc. (2019). AARC clinical practice guideline bland aerosol administration—2003 revision & update. Retrieved 24 September 2019, from https://www.aarc.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/05.03.529.pdf

Dhanani, J., Fraser, J. F., Chan, H. K., Rello, J., Cohen, J., & Roberts, J. A. (2016). Fundamentals of aerosol therapy in critical care. Critical Care20(1), 269.

Myers, T. R. (2015). Year in review 2014: Aerosol delivery devices. Respiratory care60(8), 1190-1196.

Pinto, V. L., & Sharma, S. (2019). Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP). In StatPearls [Internet]. StatPearls Publishing.

WHO. (2011). Apnea monitors. Retrieved 24 September 2019, from https://www.who.int/medical_devices/innovation/apnea_monitor.pdf