Sample Paper on Power of the Constitutional Convention

Power of the Constitutional Convention

In the US, both the senate and House of Representatives (HOR) constitute the congress. The two houses were created in 1787 by the constitutional convention after a long period of deliberation.[1] The two houses came into being when the issue of representation became a big issue among the member states. Initially, all the states had two senators each, but when some states opposed this decision, the founding fathers had no option other than to develop a bi-Carmel house.[2]. Under this system, each state has equal representation in the senate, but the representation in the HOR is dependent on the states’ populations. The members of the senate serve for a period of six years while those of the latter house serve for a period of two years.[3] This analytical essay evaluates the exclusive powers of the two houses with an aim of establishing how these powers maintain democracy in the USA.

Originally, the HOR had sixty-five members while the senate had one hundred members. However, as time went by and population increased in respective states, the constitution changed the number of the members of HOR to match the population changes. The purpose of changing this number was to enable states have equal representation in the congress as it was originally intended in the constitutional convention of 1787. Today, the number of representatives in the house of HOR from every state is based on the states’ population, and according to the 1929 agreement, the current number is at 435.[4] This means that the congress has a total of 535 members.

The US constitution gives the HOR two major powers. First, the constitution gives this house the powers of coming up with the bills that pertain to raising revenue.[5] These powers are exclusive to this house because the senate does not have such powers even if it has some influence on this responsibility. Second, the constitution gives this house the powers to elect the president in case no presidential candidate garners majority votes from the Electoral College.[6]

Other than granting the HOR exclusive powers over the senate, the constitution also gives the senate exclusive powers over HOR. First, the senate has exclusive powers of either approving or disapproving certain appointments that the president makes.[7] Second, the senate under the constitution has powers to evaluate treaties. In addition, it has exclusive powers that enable it to evaluate certain bills that originate from the HOR. In particular, although the HOR has the responsibility of introducing bills that pertain to raising revenue, the senate has the responsibility of evaluating these bills. With regard to these bills, the senate may either concur with those bills or not.

According to the US constitution, granting the HOR the powers to elect the president in case no presidential candidate garners the majority votes from the Electoral College enhances democracy in the following manner. The members of this house are elected based on the population of their states. This means that the more number of American citizens live in a certain state, the more representatives that state has in the congress. From a democratic viewpoint, the members of this house represent their electorate. Therefore, they can make law on their behalf or represent them on national matters. The issue of electing the president when Electoral College fails to produce the desired results is of national interest that the members of HOR can do on behalf of their electorates.[8] By so doing, the exclusive powers of the HOR maintain democracy. The same applies to the exclusive powers of the senate.

 

Bibliography

Beschloss, Michael. Our documents: 100 milestone documents from the National Archives. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.

Guttery, Ben. Representing Texas: a comprehensive history of U.S. and Confederate senators and representatives from Texas. S.l: s.n, 2008.

Kromkowski, Charles A. 2002. Recreating the American republic rules of apportionment, constitutional change, and American political development, 1700-1870. New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, 2002.

United States. The United States government manual, 2011. Washington, D.C.: Office of the Federal Register, 2011.

 

[1] Ben, Guttery. Representing Texas: a comprehensive history of U.S. and Confederate senators and representatives from Texas. (S.l: s.n, 2008), 3.

[2] Charles, Kromkowski A. 2002. Recreating the American republic rules of apportionment, constitutional change, and American political development, 1700-1870. (New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press, 2002), 261.

[3] Micahel, Beschloss. Our documents: 100 milestone documents from the National Archives. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006), 28.

[4] Ben, Guttery. P. 4.

[5] Michael, Beschloss. p. 29.

[6] Ben, Guttery. P. 3.

[7] United States. The United States government manual, 2011. (Washington, D.C.: Office of the Federal Register, 2011).

[8] Ben, Guttery. P. 3.