Sample Management Paper on Unpaid Internships

Unpaid Internships

Part One

Source #1
Type of source (e.g. journal article, website, etc.)

Journal article

Scholarly or non-scholarly

Scholarly

Full (formatted) APA 6th Reference

Grant‐Smith, D., & McDonald, P. (2018). Ubiquitous yet ambiguous: An integrative review of unpaid work. International Journal of Management Reviews20(2), 559-578.

Evaluation (approx. 2-3 sentences for each)

Relevance of the source:

This source is relevant to the question of whether organizations should be allowed to offer unpaid internships to individuals. It gives insight into the benefits and costs of unpaid work.

Credibility of the source:

This source is credible as it contains in-depth information regarding the topic or question at hand. It has a specific audience comprising of students, the general population, and professionals in various fields. It is written by qualified and renowned authors and it is published on a reputable scholarly journal.

 

Source #2
Type of source (e.g. journal article, website, etc.)

Journal article

Scholarly or non-scholarly

Scholarly

Full (formatted) APA 6th Reference

Reynolds, A., & Findley, H. (2012). Taking Advantage of Interns: Unpaid Internships. ASBBS Proceedings19(1), 767.

Evaluation (approx. 2-3 sentences for each)

Relevance of the source:

This source is relevant to the question or topic as it argues that even though unpaid internships are not illegal, they are gradually becoming a concern for both interns and employers. The source further delves into the advantages and disadvantages of unpaid internships from the perspective of employers and interns.

Credibility of the source:

This source’s credibility is underlined by the in-depth information contained therein, the specific targeted audience comprising of learners, the general population, and professionals in various fields. Also, the source is authored by a renowned scholar at Troy University.

 

Source #3
Type of source (e.g. journal article, website, etc.)

Website

Scholarly or non-scholarly

Non-scholarly

Full (formatted) APA 6th Reference

Thompson, D. (2012, May 10). Unpaid Internships: Bad for Students, Bad for Workers, Bad for Society. Retrieved from https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2012/05/unpaid-internships-bad-for-students-bad-for-workers-bad-for-society/256958/

Evaluation (approx. 2-3 sentences for each)

Relevance of the source:

This source is relevant to the topic or question as it explores how bad unpaid internships are for students, workers, and society.

Credibility of the source:

This source is credible as it contains in-depth information relevant to the question or topic in focus. It also serves the purpose of convincing the targeted audience about the shortcomings of unpaid internships.

 

 

 

Part Two: Essay

It is debatable as to whether employers should be allowed to offer unpaid internships.

Unpaid internships are increasingly becoming common in today’s workplaces. In the United States, for instance, it is estimated that the unpaid intern population stands at close to 100,000. However, there is misunderstanding of what internship is and the role employers should play in the same particularly when the focus is on providing unpaid internship. An intern refers to a student at an advanced level or graduate in a given professional filed who seeks to gain practical experience. A person holding an internship position is one looking for a special kind of training that will help to improve or prepare him or her for experience in the real world. Unfortunately, unpaid internships have been used for the wrong purposes hence the rising concerns on whether employers should be allowed to offer the same. Nonetheless, it is debatable as to whether employers should be allowed to offer unpaid internships.

There are numerous benefits of unpaid internships thus discrediting the argument that unpaid internships should not be allowed. First, from a mainstream employability viewpoint, unpaid internship is of great benefit in terms of the improvement of skills, experience, and knowledge as well as assisting interns to match their human capital profile to the demands or requisites of the labor market. In other words, unpaid internship helps in the enhancement of the long-term marketability of interns (Grant‐Smith & McDonald, 2018). Second, unpaid internships are beneficial from the perspective of employers and businesses hosting the unpaid workers. The benefits can be expressed in terms of corporate responsibility as the businesses or employers appear to be giving back not only to their respective industries but also to the community (Grant‐Smith & McDonald, 2018). Third, for employers, unpaid internships are seen as a low cost and low risk means as far as the recruitment of new employees is concerned (Grant‐Smith & McDonald, 2018). Fourth, in as much as unpaid internships may be a disadvantage to the interns to some extent, it helps companies and businesses to keep productivity at par. This is believed to be one of the major reasons for employers’ actions as far as obtaining interns is concerned (Reynolds & Findley, 2012).

Despite the numerous benefits that accompany unpaid internships for both interns and employers or businesses, the greatest concern is about whether they are fair or offer opportunities for exploitation. First, one of the major determiners of whether one accesses unpaid internship in various organizations is whether they have external support. This means that individuals without any external support cannot take a beneficial unpaid position.  The external support that puts one at an advantage when it comes to taking unpaid internship is hardly available from individuals from marginalized groups (Schnitman, 2014). In the United States, people color as well as LGBTQ person n are unlikely to get opportunities of unpaid internship. This implies that unpaid internships come with barriers for the underprivileged members in society (Thompson, 2012). Second, in most cases, unpaid internship tends to benefit employers rather than interns. According to the United States Labor Department, unpaid internship is only legal if the training offered to the intern is similar to that which would have been given in an educational setting (Bennett, 2011). The Labor Department also stresses that an unpaid intern must not cause a displacement of paid employees (Thompson, 2012). These aspects are largely ignored by many employers today meaning that a majority of unpaid internships are illegal and must not be allowed. Third, surveys conducted across the United States reveal that unpaid internships are avenues for exploitation by companies or businesses interested in free labor (Morris, 2018). In fact, a number of unpaid internships do not help to start the interns’ careers. It is even worse that students who undertake paid internships find better and well-paying jobs as compared to their unpaid counterparts.

In sum, it is debatable as to whether organizations should be allowed to offer unpaid allowances. As discussed above, unpaid internships have various benefits for both employers and interns. However, those at a great disadvantage when it comes to unpaid internships are the interns themselves. Employers or businesses continue to take advantage of unpaid internships and use them as avenues for exploiting interns, and this is at the center of discussions against unpaid internship.

 

 

 

References

Bennett, A. M. (2011). Unpaid internships & the Department of Labor: The impact of underemployment of the Fair Labor Standards Act on equal opportunity. U. Md. LJ Race, Religion, Gender & Class11, 293. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.law.umaryland.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1200&context=rrgc

Grant‐Smith, D., & McDonald, P. (2018). Ubiquitous yet ambiguous: An integrative review of unpaid work. International Journal of Management Reviews20(2), 559-578.

Morris, D. Z. (2018, July 08). Are Unpaid Internships Exploitation or Opportunity? Twitter Has Some Opinions. Retrieved from https://fortune.com/2018/07/08/unpaid-internships-twitter-debate/

Reynolds, A., & Findley, H. (2012). Taking Advantage of Interns: Unpaid Internships. ASBBS Proceedings19(1), 767.

Schnitman, M. L. (2014). The Price of Unpaid Internships. Retrieved from https://wesscholar.wesleyan.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://scholar.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=2325&context=etd_hon_theses

Thompson, D. (2012, May 10). Unpaid Internships: Bad for Students, Bad for Workers, Bad for Society. Retrieved from https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2012/05/unpaid-internships-bad-for-students-bad-for-workers-bad-for-society/256958/