Sample English Essays on understanding Art

Understanding Art

What do people understand or think of when they hear the term “art?” Often, people have the opinion that the primary purpose of food is to satisfy pleasure. Of course, such people do not understand the real meaning of eating. Similarly, people with the perception that art’s purpose is to satisfy pleasure cannot understand the true meaning of art and its purpose. This is because they view art in its connection with a phenomenon of life, the false aim of pleasure. People should move from viewing art as a pleasure and instead consider it as a condition of human life (Tolstoy 1). From this point, people will not fail to realize that art is a means of intercourse or interaction between man and man. Fundamentally, art refers to a wide range of human activities in the creation of visual and performing artifacts that express the technical or imaginative skills of the author, which in most cases, seeks appreciation for their emotional power and beauty (Doulas 2). Although several people believe that art is something that satisfies pleasure, it is an artifact that connects man to man, specifically the author and the viewer with the viewer expected to appreciate the author’s technical and imaginative abilities.

There are different types of art including plastic arts, performing arts, and practical arts. Plastic art is a type of art that involves the making of something, and this is where fine art is prominent. Fine art can further be defined as an author’s expression often achieved when he or she makes something that is beautiful and appeals to the viewer’s emotions through a visual means. Fine art may include painting, sculpture, drawing, and printmaking. Another sub-category of plastic arts can be literature where an author comes up with creative writing or poetry that are appealing to another person’s emotions. Performing arts involve expressions using the body and include acting, dancing, and singing. On the other hand, practical arts include cooking, filming, architecture, photography, and fashion (Brandt 173).

Could it be true that the definition of art and views regarding types and forms of artwork differ from one artist to another? Of course, the definition of art has changed significantly over the years with different artists defining the concept from what they believe their purpose in the field of art is. For instance, Mark Rothko, who is an American artist, believes that art is not all about the relationship of form, color, or similar, but rather the expression of basic emotions of human beings including ecstasy, tragedy, doom, and others (Maraviglia n.p.). Alexander Daniloff, a Russian artist, living in Italy, defines art as an artifact that serves the primary purpose of speaking for an artist or a specific period. Daniloff further argues that art is best measured in human dimensions implying that art should whisper rather than shout. Jonathan Ball, an artist behind Poked Studio, believes that art is something that in spite of being just splotches and blobs when viewed from close range, exhibits beauty in itself with different colors, texture, saturation, and intensity (Maraviglia n.p.).

Amidst the disagreements and evolution of the definition of art, a generally agreed upon definition is that art is an idea of technical or imaginative skill that stems from human creation and agency (Dean 32). From this general definition, many people agree that art-related activities could include the criticism of art, the production of works of art, aesthetic dissemination of art, and the study of art history. Every person would agree that any exhibition of skill or mastery by an individual constitutes art. Of course, the exhibition of mastery and skill can be evident in typical examples such as dance, theater, music, and film. These fall under the type of arts known as performing arts. This general definition of art would not be far from the appropriate definition of art as a wide range of human activities in the creation of visual and performing artifacts that express the technical or imaginative skills of the author.

One most important thing about art is that it connects the author or artist and the viewer (Dean 29). In most cases, the viewer is expected to appreciate the author’s technical and imaginative abilities. For instance, Mona Lisa, a painting done by Leonardo da Vinci, an Italian artist, is one of the world’s most famous artwork. There is no doubt that da Vinci creates a connection between himself and viewers of this painting. Besides, through the painting, da Vinci has succeeded in expressing his emotional and imaginative skills to any person who views this piece. These are some of the reasons da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa” painting qualifies as an artistic piece. However, some people might discredit “Mona Lisa” painting as artistic piece since they do not have any form of connection to it, as stated in the definition of art.

In conclusion, art is one of the concepts about which people often disagree. A section of people believes that art is an avenue through which an author expresses his emotional and imaginative skills to viewers. Others believe that art is something that is performed and is beautiful and appeals to the viewer. However, a generally agreed upon definition is that art is an idea of technical or imaginative skill that stems from human creation and agency. What is important about art is that it creates a connection between one man and another.

 

 

Works Cited

Brandt, Per Aage. “Form and meaning in art.” The artful mind: Cognitive science and the riddle of human creativity (2006): 171-188.

Dean, Jeffrey T. “The nature of concepts and the definition of art.” The Journal of aesthetics and art criticism 61.1 (2003): 29-35. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1540-6245.00089/full

Doulas, Louis. “Art: Definitions and Analyses.” (2014). http://louisdoulas.info/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Art-Definitions.pdf

Maraviglia, Marilina. About Art- What Do We Really Mean. (2010, July 23). https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/07/what-do-we-really-mean-by-art/

Tolstoy, Leo. What is art?. Penguin UK, 1995. http://web.mnstate.edu/gracyk/courses/phil%20of%20art/printer-friendly/Tolstoy_on_Art_TWO_COLUMNS.pdf