Sample Annotated Bibliography on “In the Waiting Room”

Annotated Bibliography on “In the Waiting Room”

“In the waiting, Room” addresses the pursuit of  individuality in addition to identity. The pursuit revolves within the community as the young girl expresses her experiences, questions her humanity and compares herself with others. She attempts to understand her connection with others, her aunt, the “naked  woman” in the streets, and how she got her where she is. She questions her connections with the others in  the world in general. She denotes her uniqueness with the others, her rebirth comes with a “scream” that signals her birth, her natural identity. To the born poet, “you and I” becomes a nothingness. The poem signifies the traditional bond existing between the self and the outside world. As she experiences her identity, the child awakens in shock, terror, to the realization and identification with the other people. The poem registers the poets craving  for individual distinction, difference, and uniqueness.

Kuo, Alexander, and Yotam Margalit. “Measuring individual identity: Experimental evidence.” Comparative Politics 44.4 (2012): 459-479.

Kuo, Yotam, Marglit, and Alexander explore the significance of individual belonging to questions directed at unearthing the feeling that comes with identifying oneself as a unique entity connected and bonded with others through and by situational phenomena (Kuo et al, 459). The authors of “measuring individual identity: experimental evidence” show that difference and changes in individual distinctiveness are influenced by situational prompts which do not correspond with policy preferences (Kuo et al, 460).

The author’s finding is important in unraveling the distinct, unique attributes that exist between individuals and that set people apart. It thus helps in understanding the important aspect of collective individuality and the common aspect of societal identity as evidenced by the poem in “In the Waiting Room”. The awakening feeling of discovery comes with the realization of the unique feeling of separation from others and the scary sensation of self-discovery.

Jenkins, Richard. Social identity. Routledge, 2014.

It takes a great deal of soul searching to identify oneself, make a discovery in the strange journey of understanding oneself, and the most difficult of accepting the variance that separates one from others. In the book “Social Identity”, Richard Jenkins explores the journey, factors, anecdotes, fears, and phenomena that entail individual recognition, discovery, and self. “Who are you?” The author poses the strange question and argues that when identity becomes and concern,  most individuals are faced with a difficult time in going beyond the identity name and recognizing that the is more to a person than the name, physical appearance, and social recognition (Jenkins, 3). The author argues that in order to discover oneself, it is important to take the long journey to self-discovery and actualization before one identifies with a given social group with the society.

The author uses anthropology, sociology, and social psychology theories to show the variance in differences, similarities, and interaction in the face of self-identification. The reading forms an important aspect of realizing oneself and in understanding Elizabeth Bishop’s “In the Waiting Room”. The young girl has to take a short impromptu journey through the National Geographic 1998 February Issue  in order to come to the realization of an awareness, a uniqueness, and a connection with others that was previously non-existent. From Richard Jenkins book, it is possible to understand why the young girl took the short journey in order to make a self-discovery of the uniqueness that exists between herself and her auntie, and the “naked woman” in the streets. Richard (5) emphasizes on the aspect of making a journey of discovery, similar to the one the girl (poet) made before discovering her uniqueness.

Sedikides, Constantine, and Marilynn B. Brewer eds. Individual self, relational self, collective self. Psychology Press, 2015.

Marilynn, Constantine, and Sedikides argue that self-concept entails the collective self, individual self, and the relationship self.  The authors maintain that individuals seek to achieve self-identity and understanding through I, unique traits, II, through dyadic relationship, and III, through group membership. All the above ways of identification point to a collective concept whereby an individual attempts to realize self-consciousness within the realm of the society (Sedikides et al, 1). It becomes challenging to accept and analyze the above aspects of individualism without stumbling upon self-conflict. However, the authors maintain that this can only be achieved through and by embracing with substantial others. By assimilating with a significant other, an individual is capable of defining his or her role within the ideology of the uniting group or relationship. Through this ,an individual is able to personalize a bond with others and make the self discovery on the societal facet and at a personal level.

The reading forms an important aspect of understanding on Elizabeth Bishop’s poem on self-identity and actualization within the society and within a relationship. It gives one a chance of reflection, contemplation, and meditation that leads to the revelation of the individual identity and societal recognition. Despite the challenge of achieving relationship self through establishing a relationship with others, it forms the core of self-identity and recognition. Amidst the confusion, uniqueness, and difference self-identity comes as a shocker to most individuals (Sedikides et al, 2). The authors emphasize the need to practice patience in the attempt to achieve self-recognition.

 

 

 

Works Cited

Jenkins, Richard. Social identity. Routledge, 2014.

Kuo, Alexander, and Yotam Margalit. “Measuring individual identity: Experimental evidence.” Comparative Politics 44.4 (2012): 459-479.

Sedikides, Constantine, and Marilynn B. Brewer eds. Individual self, relational self, collective self. Psychology Press, 2015.