Religious Studies Assignment Paper on Justification By Faith In The Book Of Romans

JUSTIFICATION BY FAITH IN THE BOOK OF ROMAN

Introduction

The word faith is used with at least five different particular technicalities in the New Testament. Paul uses the phrase to mean easy perception or psychological approval of ‘historical facts’ as well as trust or dependency upon another.[1]However, it is identified that the apostle had a particular concept in consideration when he created the announcement that man is validated by his belief.

Paul shows from the scriptures of Old Testament through the cases of David and Abraham that validation is God’s gift, appropriated by believing in Christ. In addition, he portrays that a person cannot justify based on his or her deeds. Paul has dedicated the first three sections to confirm that the whole globe is accountable before God. He has most lately created the factor that “by Law’s work, no skin will be validated,” that “none are righteous” and that “all are unsuccessful of the wonder of God”.[2]However, God in his graciousness, offered validation through Christ. Therefore, by believing in Christ, an individual can be validated in the vision of God. To confirm his factor, Paul reveals that there are no exclusions. In addition, he indicates that this is not a new concept by providing spiritual illustrations from the lifestyles of David and Abraham.

The book of romance points out that Abraham was the fist man to be justified by God in the early days. Paul knows that in the Judaism thoughts, Abraham was the only individual who was justified by his work. However, his discussion confirms that no man can be justified by his work but by his faith in Christ. Therefore, Paul reveals that even for Abraham, who lived an exceptional lifestyle and for whom there is no spiritual history of heinous sins, his validation was still by believing in Jesus Christ. Paul’s sensible argument realizes an offering concept. At first, Paul beats his discussion by directing that even though one might boast before other men, it is impossible that one would boast before God.

In addition, Paul’s argument can be identified as a theoretical discussion. For instance, Paul is not actually accepting that Abraham could even boast before men. However, he is saying that, even if Abraham was validated by his work (but he was not), he still could not boast before God. However, Paul’s spiritual discussion is directed from Gen. 15:6.This further validates Paul’s factor that we are validated by believing in Christ because Old Testament sacred Bible says that Abraham was also validated by believing in Christ. However, one must identify that the spiritual discussion would not be effective to Judaism viewers because they generally saw Abraham’s belief in Christ as just another work. Consequently, Paul changes his argument to discuss the distinction between work and faith to confirm his spiritual discussion.

 Paul also continues to describe what the scriptures of Genesis indicate. The main key to Paul’s information is in conditions “believed” and “reckoned”. The phrase reckoned is used in this book to mean taking something in to consideration or justifying an individual. Growing on the declaration that validation is caused by elegance, Paul factors out that if validation were dependent on work, it would not be entirely free. The phrase “gift” is vital because it reveals that righteousness “credited” for “belief” is a gift. It associates returning to the most crucial that validation is caused by elegance. Abraham’s validation was for his belief in Christ alone.

The factor of Paul’s representation is to demonstrate that a man could not take a position up under the analysis of God. If men were to get what they well deserved, they would not be acknowledged with righteousness. Nevertheless, they could be criticized to hell which is destined for those who fail to follow Gods’ guidelines. That is what is intended when David says that blessed are men against whom the Master will not consider their sins. The only protection for sin comes through believing in Christ Jesus.

Paul has confirmed rationally and scripturally that men are validated by believing in Jesus Christ. The primary problem in this area focuses on the first three sections, which educate that the work of an individual cannot take a position up under the analysis of God.[3] If men want God to forgive their sins according to their works, they can be criticized. A man is validated before God only when he allows God’s undeserved presence of righteousness through belief. Therefore, the congregation needs to be cautious not to slide into the organic propensity to pressure believers to work more and hard as a way to obtain benefit with God.

The phrase “righteousness of God” is comparative to the lord’s plan of justifying people; his plan of announcing them just in the vision of the Law; or of acquitting them from penalties, and acknowledging them to benefit.[4]However, majority of individuals understands righteousness to mean hard work. On the other hand, God expects righteous people to have a strong faith in Jesus Christ. The item regarded to be done is to consider individuals as if they were righteous. However, some people have been trying to achieve it by obeying the law. Nevertheless, God’s strategy was to achieve it by believing in Christ. Thus, this book indicates that human interpretation of the word righteousness differs from the real meaning intended by God. Therefore, it points out that human beings cannot be justified by God using their own strategy or understanding. Hence, the strategy of God is the sensible, fantastic and the only method that can be used to make man justified before God. The apostle reveals that it only by believes in Christ but not in a person’s work that an individual can be justified. Thus, this is what is considered as “righteousness of God”, and which is exposed in the gospel.

To understand the implication of believing in Christ, the congregation can look at the connection as well as the regular significance of the conditions. The phrase to “justify”, indicates effectively “to be just, simple, and righteous”. It is then used as a method to “declare”, as righteous when a man is billed with an offence. If the criminal activity claimed is not shown against him, the states laws pronounce him innocent.[5] It does not mean that the man did not make the offence; or that the Law might not have declared him responsible for it. However, it implies that the offender is forgiven and justified by the law. [6]Nevertheless, only an individual with the capacity to pardon can do this. Therefore, God is the only one with the powers to forgive and pronounce an individual innocent. Moreover, he does it through naming and granting the gift. The style of Paul in this epistle is to demonstrate how this is done or to demonstrate that it is done by believing in Christ.

Paul’s epistle to the Romans is indeed a theological work of art that has been used for hundreds of years to determine what appropriate cathedral doctrine is. By using discussion stories like that of David and Abraham, Paul demonstrates justification by faith in contrast to justification by work. Paul’s primary dissertation is justification by faith as the only indication of approval by God. It is by God’s righteousness contrary to our self-righteousness that Christ provides us his favor. This righteousness comes to us in regards to a person’s belief in God. However, Paul clarifies that the blood of Jesus Christ is the only righteousness gift.

In describing the important factors of Spiritual Christianity, Paul states that every individual is a sinner ruined to everlasting penalties. In God’s vision, every man, woman and kid is “guilty” before him. From Adam to Jesus, all men are limited by sin. God cannot save individuals out of their sins because of excellent actions or via spiritual observance. In the second section, Paul describes that maintaining law rather than believing in Christ promotes hypocrisy. Even the Jewish people, who have an exclusive position in the programs and reasons of God as their selected individuals, will be cursed because of not believing in Jesus. Paul demonstrates that, if we keep out of our lives, then we will be under his anger. Furthermore, no one can declare that God works unjustly or badly regarding justification of the righteous. Because it is clear that no one can come to God or receive God’s benefits but by through believing in Jesus Christ. Moreover, righteousness can only be granted to an individual through individual belief in God’s Son. In fact, Abraham obeyed God, and because of that, he was considered as righteous before God.

A righteous person always gets favors from God and justification. Moreover, such righteousness is supposed to change individuals’ lifestyles. By dwelling in the Holy Spirit, we are motivated to be righteous in our everyday lifestyle. In addition, righteousness changes our mindset, performance, and perspective. For instance, Paul talks of dedicating our lifestyles to God and not to laws and regulations, rules and spiritual observances.

In the book of Romans, we discover ideal information that is important to Christians. We learn that a person’s lifestyle is God’s work. Moreover, a person’s present style of living determines his justification by God.[7] Through Paul’s argument, it is clear that God wants all individuals to be justified by their faith in Christ so that they can enter the kingdom of heaven. He further clarifies that no one can see the kingdom through his excellent work on earth or by obeying the doctrines and the law set by the church. Therefore, what Christians should do is to believe the Gospel of Christ instead of depending on religious beliefs. With Paul, we must independently take a position and announce that we are not embarrassed of the gospel of Christ: for it only the power of God that can save sinners.

Conclusion

            When the apostle Paul had written to the religious believers, he desired them to comprehend the gospel he preached everywhere he went. That gospel reveals the righteousness of God, both individual righteousness in staying trustworthy to his commandments and the supply of righteousness to those who believe in God’s son.[8]Nevertheless, authentic belief in Christ is known by the dedication that comes with it and the modern sanctification, which emerges from it. However, it is only by believing in Jesus Christ that an individual can get salvation from God. If we believe in Christ, our lifestyles will confirm it. Nevertheless, God does not rationalize those who perform to win his benefit. Finally, it is so unfortunate that any person who does not believe in Christ is not considered righteous no matter how hard he works or obeys the church law. Therefore, for any one to be saved, he or she must believe in the gospel of God and repent his or her sins.

Bibliography

Bauer, Walter and others, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament, 2nd ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009).

Cranfield, C. E. B., The Epistle to the Romans Vol. 1. (Edinburg, T. & T. Clark LTD, 2005).

Godet, F., Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (Grand Rapids: Michigan, Zondervan Publishing House, 2006).

Josephus, The Works of Josephus, Trans. by William Whiston (Peabody, Mass: Hendrickson Publishers, 2007).

Lenski, R. C. H., The Interpretation of St. Paul’s Epistle to the Romans (Columbus, Ohio: Wartburg Press, 2005).

Metzger, Bruce, A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament (Stutgart: United Bible Societies, 2001).

Oden, Thomas C. Classic Christianity: A Systematic Theology. New York: Harper One,2004.

Olson, Roger E. Arminian Theology: Myths and Realities. Downer’s Grove: InterVarsity, 2006.

Schreiner, Thomas R. Romans.Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. Grand

Rapids: Baker, 1998.

Vine, W. E., Merrill F. Unger, and William White, Jr. Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of

Old and New Testament Words. Nashville: Nelson, 2006.

Westerholm, Stephen. Israel’s Law and the Church’s Faith: Paul and His Recent Interpreters.

Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2008.


[1] Metzger, Bruce, A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament (Stutgart: United Bible Societies, 2001).

[2] Bauer, Walter and others, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament, 2nd ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009).

[3] Westerholm, Stephen. Israel’s Law and the Church’s Faith: Paul and His Recent Interpreters. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2008.

[4] Bauer, Walter and others, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament, 2nd ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009).

[5] Bauer, Walter and others, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament, 2nd ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009).

[6] Godet, F., Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (Grand Rapids: Michigan, Zondervan Publishing House, 2006).

[7] Josephus, The Works of Josephus, Trans. by William Whiston (Peabody, Mass: Hendrickson Publishers, 2007).

[8] Schreiner, Thomas R. Romans.Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. Grand

Rapids: Baker, 1998.