Health Care Research Paper on the Recovery Process

The Recovery Process

Introduction

Recovery is a systematic procedure where a person shifts from using drugs to drug free by becoming an energetic contributing member of the community. Recovery is most effective when service users’ needs and ambitions are given priority during the care and treatment progression. Recovery support systems that have been cautiously been prepared to battle the need for drugs participate in a significant task in assisting individuals with a substance abuse problem to recover (Jason et al, 2007, p 803). Substance abuse is a persistent stipulation which calls for formulated programs to have distinct treatment experiences to be executed through continual recovery systems. The most significant step in the procedure of recovery is assisting patients confess that they have an addiction setback.  After treatment, many individuals return to the former risk environments or family situations that are stressful. Approaches should be investigated to set hopeful forms of recovery residence. The purpose of this paper will be to highlight the background of the recovery process, the objectives of recovery programs, some of the principles and elements of these programs, and a model of a support recovery program to illustrate all these.

Background on Recovery Process

Substance related disorders pose serious problems to the health, and costs to the families and friends of the user.  Despite the increased knowledge warning on the substance abuse, and efforts to combat the problem, the number of the users is still the same. The recovery process helps patients to achieve abstinence, although relapses are substantial. There have been efforts by many groups, mutual health groups such as supports in Orange county of California. Numerous studies have been approved out on particular features of support services necessary in the recovery procedure. Among persons whose degree or severity of this dependence are high, and as such have condensed probability of recovery, social support systems in sober communities are the primary power aspects of long term recovery (Jason et al, 2001; Jason, Davis and Ferrari, 2007). Brown and Lewis, (1999) and Gruber and Fleetwood, (2004) also hypothesize that amid support services that engage one or more relatives and acquaintances, offering social support services keeps the progression of recovery on trail.

Accessing Recovery

This is a programs that has four major intentions; boost the quantity of faith and community based help for clinical and recovery support services, maintain a outsized client selection, and develop capacity (Brown et al, 1998, pg.145). This system provides clients with a wide selection of appropriate treatment givers, where one can obtain the desirable healing services. They offer flexible plans and execution processes that are reliable with established molds of care, making a guarantee that the customers have an indisputable and autonomous selection amid the authorized givers. It also offers an assortment of medical and recovery support devices to those identified with substance addiction, thus meeting a person desires (Gruber et al, 2004, pg. 1375).

 Many recovery programs believe there is no one way for effectively treating people with substance abuse problems. Research indicates that treatment is effective when there is diversity in treatment approaches, individuals respond favorably. The program assists in progress of participants’ capabilities in regions that are vital in retaining a drug free way of life. Through addition of the number of community based help, the recovery program is able to rehabilitate the individual as a whole, change their negative patterns of thinking feeling and behaving, develop the individuals interpersonal skills, and help them have a drug free lifestyle. The community based help is able to achieve this by enabling individuals to give feedback, foster relationships and express feelings and thoughts.

Principles of Recovery

One principle of recovery is that it is aimed at and steered by the own individual, the individual being his own manager of improvement. The individual has power to formulate choices based on the targets prepared that influence the recuperation process. Recovery also involves the individual acknowledging that they have a crisis and are willing to look for aid in order to control the disarray, and be motivated to stick to the process.  Recovery is a progression of achieving greater balance of the mind, body and spirit, through emotional physical and spiritual incorporation of a person. It is a continuous learning process, and encourages a sense of self empowerment, thus advancing ones worth of living.

The recovery progression of a person is affected by the cultural beliefs. The culture has significant implications on the patient and provider relationship, developing higher satisfaction and accurate history of the patient through better communication. Recovery may entail seasons of deterioration and wellness, since it’s a never-ending procedure and individuals persistently develop during the recovery process. People seeking recovery regularly gain optimism from those who are also going through recovery. They gain motivation by seeing that people can conquer the complications and they build up a sense of appreciation each day all through the recovery process.

Elements of Recovery –Oriented systems of Care

The Recovery oriented systems of care sustain person centered and self undeviating approaches to care that fabricate on the power and flexibility of self, relatives and society, to take accountability for their continued health, recuperation from alcohol and drug evils and the wellness. ROSCs involve a continuing progression of structure upgrading that integrates the incidents of persons in recuperation. Recovery oriented systems of care will be personalized, all-inclusive, and supple. They will adjust to the requests of the persons are intended to maintain recovery process in years.

These systems will be introduced in the community in order to improve accessibility of support capacities of families and social networks. Individual using this system will have the suitable services to select from at any point of time. Recovery oriented systems will highlight on individuals strong points, to display the significance and thoughts of individual when dealing with life matters. The systems will also be ethnically sensitive, knowledgeable and open, because the traditions and values of individuals are assorted and may have an effect on the recovery efforts (Jason et al, 2002, pg.23).

Recovery Support Services

Recovery support services (RSSs) are nonclinical services that support persons to recuperate from alcohol or drug evils. They comprise social support, connection to and bringing together state amid associated service donors and a complete variety of human services that assist in recuperation and wellness leading to an enhanced worth of living. They can be conveyed in background such as self-supporting recovery society, as an element of treatment organizations, and as services presented by faith based unions. Examples include; Peer support service, Faith-based recovery support and Agency provided support services (Zarkin et al, 2005, pg. 50).

Peer Support Services

These are service designed and offered by peers who have achieved handy skills in both the progression of recuperation and sustenance, and these individuals are designated to be peer leaders (Davidson, 2009, p.87). They offer their time to provide responses to the community by assisting them maintain their recuperation. They provide emotional support, provision of information by helping teach and acquire new skills, provide instrumental support, and consequently help establish positive social connections with others in recovery.

Faith-based Recovery Support

They mostly offer service by the foundation of religion, of values and rites. They provide services that are consistent with recovery support services and mainly frequent regions with a great amount of ethnic and racial minorities (Davidson, 2009, pg.89). They aid in sustenance of the person and relatives, and support of treatment devotion and continuing recovery support.

Agency Provided Support Services

These people are particularly trained for the job, and may themselves be in recovery or may have a family member in recovery. They execute a range of responsibilities under management of clinical personnel, and can serve as recuperation coaches or recuperation managers.

Model of support in Orange County California

The orange county support program directories include the Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. The Alcohol Anonymous is an association of gentleman and ladies who share occurrences, potencies and optimism with each other that they may resolve their general setback. It ensures that keen care to social services for people in the recovery process is taken note of. It also ensures there is no wrong way to treatment, that is, people can enter at any appropriate level when needed not just in time of crisis. The persons’ preference should be esteemed. The programs must be supple and customized according to the individual.

 The department of Alcohol and drugs program developed practice Guidelines for recovery oriented behavioral health care. This document identifies some domains of recovery oriented systems of care which include primacy of participation, promoting access and engagement by facilitating swift entry to care, ensuring there is a continuity in care  by using a carefully created system, offering individualized recovery planning through ensuring individual receives the service requested for. Providers also need to have an adequate knowledge of the individuals’ local community so that the communication will be smooth. Identifying and addressing barriers to recoveries, and strategies executed to ensure that they are addressed and solved.

Conclusion

A recovery system focuses on the individual and the family; it provides the person in recuperation with alternatives that are steady in their principles, wants and customs (Jason et al, 2007, pg 817). Access recovery programs are set up and the system provides clients with a wide selection of appropriate treatment givers, where one can obtain the desirable healing services.  Typically, after treatment for substance abuse, many patients return to the former high risk environment or stressful family situations and that is why systems like the Recovery oriented systems of care sustain person centered and self undeviating approaches. They fabricate on the power and flexibility of self, relatives and society, to take accountability for their continued health, recuperation from alcohol and drug evils and their wellness. They promote access and engagement by facilitating swift entry to care, ensuring that there is continuity in care by using a carefully created system, offering individualized recovery planning through ensuring individual receives the service requested for. Additionally, they ensure they have an adequate knowledge of the individuals’ local community so that the communication will be smooth. Identifying and addressing barriers to recoveries, and strategies executed to ensure that they are addressed and solved.

References

Brown, S. & Lewis, V. (1998). The alcoholic family in recovery: a developmental model. New York, NY: Guilford Press.  

Davidson, L. (2009). A practical guide to recovery-oriented practice: Tools for transforming health care. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Gruber, K.J., & Fleetwood, T.W. (2004). “In-home continuing care services for substance use  Affected families.” Substance Use & Misuse, 39, 1370-1403.

Jason, L.A., Davis, M.I., & Ferrari, J.R., (2007). “The need for substance abuse after-care: 

           Longitudinal analysis of Oxford House.” Addiction Behaviors, 32, 803-818.

Jason, L.A., Davis, M.I., Ferrari, J.R., & Bishop, P.D. (2001). “Oxford House: A review of Research and implications for substance abuse recovery and community research.” Journal of Drug Education, 31, 1-27.

Zarkin, G.A., Bray, J.W., Mitra, D., Cisler, R.A., &Kivlahan, D.F. (2005). “Cost methodology  Of Combine.” Journal of Studies on Alcohol Supplement, 15, 50-55.

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