Factors That Led to The Emergence of The Nation-State System in Europe

Description of Issue Researched

The issue researched on or at the center of focus is the factors that led to the emergence of the nation-state system in Europe. There has been the need to understand the nation-state system as it has become widespread over the years. Europe, South America, Asia, and Africa have what are comprised of nation-states. Campbell, MacKinnon, and Stevens define nation-state as a term bringing together the aspects of “nation” and “state” and thus, refers to a specific kind of state providing a sovereign territory to a given nation. They believe that some of the factors behind the emergence of the nation-state system in Europe include the decline of the long rule and pervasive influence of the Catholic Church, the expansion of literacy, and the bubonic plague that saw people question allegiance and belief in the Catholic Church opting for the nation-state system. Habermas is of the view that the emergence of the nation-system in Europe is because of the national consciousness that was disseminated by propaganda.[1] Moreover, Wimmer and Feinstein argue that the emergence of the nation-state system in Europe can be attributed to the French and American revolutions that occurred towards the end of the eighteenth century.

There is a close relationship between the issue of the emergence of the nation-state system and the concept of global citizenship. A term that has gained popularity since the 1990s, global citizenship refers to a situation where individuals around the world focus on understanding the links between human duties, human rights, and cosmopolitan beliefs.[2] In other words, it entails people staying abreast of the complex connection between the local and global contexts and seeking out information about the world. The nation-state system has ensured sovereignty for various states and allowed them to interact through trade, migration, and cultural exchange. Today, individuals in various nation-states enjoy the sovereignty and are more concerned with connecting with others both at the local and global level.[3]

Current Position on the Issue

I believe that there are several factors or reasons for the emergence of the nation-state system that has helped do away with the feudal system and the dominance and control of the Catholic Church not only over Europe but other parts of the world as well.[4] The Catholic Church stressed more on spiritual rather than political and human right issues. Unfortunately, people’s understanding of the Bible after some years of the Catholic Church’s rule saw people doubt the political and religious authority of the Catholic Church prompting the shift to the nation-state system.[5] I also believe that the nation-state system’s emergence is closely linked to the aspect of colonization that saw Western powers draw and define physical boundaries for various states.[6]

Reflection of Research Process

Research on the selected topic entailed a thorough review of journal articles on the topic. One of the obstacles I faced during the research process was finding articles that mainly address the factors that led to the emergence of the nation-state system in Europe. Most of the articles explored the issue from a general point of view with little focus on the factors leading to its emergence. However, I addressed this problem by searching for the specific issue and specific articles exploring the emergence of the nation-state system in Europe. I relied on Google Scholar where I found various articles on the topic. Some of the articles that were most helpful as they highlighted the factors for the emergence of the nation-state system in Europe include “The European nation-state: On the past and future of sovereignty and citizenship” by Jürgen Habermas and “The Rise of the Nation-State across the World, 1816 to 2001” by Andreas Wimmer and Yuval Feinstein. Regarding conducting academic research on the topic, I believe that more sources or articles should explore why the nation-state system’s origin is in Europe and not in other parts of the world. From the research conducted, I have come to understand the term global citizenship and its relationship with the nation-state system, literacy, and life-long learning. Global citizenship refers to a situation where individuals around the world focus on understanding the links between human duties, human rights, and cosmopolitan beliefs. This understanding can only come to pass when people have information literacy or acquire lifelong learning.

 

 

Bibliography

Campbell, Patricia J., Aran MacKinnon, and Christy R. Stevens. An introduction to global studies. John Wiley & Sons, 2010.

Geping, Niu. “A Model of the Modern Nation State: A Methodological Approach.” Core Ethics 6 (2010): 323-337, http://www.ritsumei.ac.jp/acd/gr/gsce/ce/2010/ng01.pdf

Habermas, Jürgen. “The European nation-state: On the past and future of sovereignty and citizenship.” Public culture 10 (1998): 397-416, https://is.muni.cz/el/1423/jaro2010/SOC763/um/lecture_11/11_1_11-Habermas.pdf

Wimmer, Andreas, and Yuval Feinstein. “The Rise of the Nation-State across the World, 1816 to 2001.” American Sociological Review 75, no. 5 (2010): 764-790., http://www.columbia.edu/~aw2951/WimmerFeinstein.pdf

 

[1] Campbell, Patricia J., Aran MacKinnon, and Christy R. Stevens. An introduction to global studies. John Wiley & Sons, 2010.

[2] Campbell, Patricia J., Aran MacKinnon, and Christy R. Stevens 26.

[3] Wimmer, Andreas, and Yuval Feinstein. “The Rise of the Nation-State across the World, 1816 to 2001.” American Sociological Review 75, no. 5 (2010): 764-790.

[4] Habermas, Jürgen. “The European nation-state: On the past and future of sovereignty and citizenship.” Public culture 10 (1998): 397-416.

[5] Campbell, Patricia J., Aran MacKinnon, and Christy R. Stevens 26.

[6] Geping, Niu. “A Model of the Modern Nation State: A Methodological Approach.” Core Ethics 6 (2010): 323-337.