English Paper on Free Education to the Illegal Immigrants Children

Based on the previous American Community research, immigrants account for 13% of the overall United States populace which is about 40.8 million. Notably, about 11.5 million immigrants that stay in the State are considered illegal and the majority are relatively young and have a significant birthrate compared to the natives. In essence, of the kids residing in the country16% are born to the authorized immigrants while 7% are sired by unauthorized immigrants (Davidson, Theresa, and Karlye 41). However, despite the various challenges faced by children of illegal immigrants such as food insecurity and overcrowded housing, education serves as the route that can enhance their upward mobility. Therefore, this paper precisely examines whether children born to illegal immigrants have the right to public education.

Illegal Immigrants Children and Free Public Education

The immigration and nationality act which is a central federal immigration law in the American State recognize any non-citizen as an authorized personnel. Further, the homeland security agency has implied the term undocumented immigrant in illustrating individuals that have entered the country unlawfully (Lad, Kaetlyn, and Désirée 1). However, policies concerned with the education of undocumented immigrant’s children have constantly stayed vague in numerous school districts.

Conversely, in the year 1982, the U.S. Supreme Court convened a landmark decision that greatly impacted immigrant’s kids and their right to public schooling in the Plyer V. Doe. The ruling held that children to unauthorized personnel have a similar right to that of teens born by the natives in regard to access to free public education (Lad, Kaetlyn, and Désirée 2). As such, youths sired by illegitimate immigrants ought to have admissions to the country’s free public education since they are equally protected by the State’s constitution.

Consequently, denying these kids the right to free public education have a significant harm to the country such as reduced illiteracy level and higher chances of criminal activities that can negatively impact the State’s economy. Further, kids brought unlawfully to America before the age of sixteen are incapable of making choices of coming to the country illegally, hence, cannot be held liable for their illegitimate status (Walsh 1). Moreover, numerous teens face numerous difficulties in getting forms of identification due to the parent’s distress of being identified and domestic school preference, thus, the need to offer free public education to the teens.

Further, undocumented kids with minimal financial capability are unable to receive financial help referred to as learner eligibility funds because they are not American natives.

Significantly, some of the legislation enacted by certain states such as California prevents schools from admitting learners that are not legitimately born to American citizens. As such, this policy plays a role in reducing literacy level among these individuals, thus, the need for free public education to illegal immigrants (Davidson, Theresa, and Karlye 43). Notably, in most of the States, the illegitimate kids are ineligible for in-state tuition rates because of the federal immigration rule that punishes states that offer in-state tuition to these children, thus, offers supplementary financial afflictions.

Consequently, the need for education to all children pertains to the constitution requirement since it is a form of promoting communism among the Americans. Moreover, offering free public education to the juveniles of illegal immigrants assist in reducing the rate of mismatch amidst the need for demand for educated professionals and the available supply of laborers (Davidson, Theresa, and Karlye 43). Notably, undocumented scholars are likely to contribute effectively to both the State’s economy and society.

Significantly, preventing students of illegal immigrants from accessing free public education has a substantial impact on the American education system as some elementary learning centers indicated a loss of about 10% of the scholar’s populace. Additionally, this reduction in school population has been linked to increased absence and minimal involvement of the immigrant kids in essential extra curriculum activities, thus, the poor performance of institutions (Lindsey 2). Importantly, refuting children of undocumented individuals from accessing free public education can lead to racial profiling, unauthorized interrogations, searches, and seizures. Further, various State policies that need schools to provide details of their students to the immigration department is a desecration of the 14th Amendment since it deters parents from admitting their juveniles in schools.

Refutations

Conversely, there are numerous arguments that try to extrapolate on the reasons why children from illegal immigrants ought not to have a free public education. For instance, critics state that in periods of inadequate resources, unauthorized kids consume educational materials that should be explicitly allocated to American legal residents (Blume 39). Further, providing financial benefits to alien children reduces savings of numerous U.S. families and increase government spending. Moreover, it is presumed that providing free public education to children born from unlawful inhabitants’ increases taxpayers’ money which is considered a burden to most of the legitimate American parents.

Significantly, it is presumed that the illegitimate immigrants escaped from corruption aligned cases and activities that were determined as unethical in their home countries, thus, should not receive educational support (Blume 39). Consequently, providing free schooling to the juveniles will increase competition for available resources such as job opportunity, thus, can deprive children of legitimate citizens’ chances of acquiring employment is some sectors of the economy.

Conversely, critics of the system argue that flooding of these kids in the country leads to the creation of various programs in schools such as English language instructions, free or lowered lunch, psychological counseling, and medication which is a burden to the government (Blume 40). Moreover, learning operations in institutions overcrowded by undocumented kids will fail since the administration will not meet the scholars’ demands as they will not handle thousands of new students competing for limited resources (Blume 38). As such, the significance of the U.S. education mechanism will be affected, thus, producing poor graduates.

Conclusion

About 11.5 million immigrants that stay in the American State are considered illegal and the majority are relatively young with significant birthrates compared to the natives. In essence, of the kids residing in the country16% are born to the authorized immigrants while 7% are of unauthorized immigrants. Most of these unauthorized immigrants children face various challenges faced by children of illegal immigrants such as food insecurity and overcrowded housing, education serves as the route that can enhance their upward mobility. In the year 1982, the U.S. Supreme Court convened a landmark decision that greatly impacted immigrant’s kids and their right to public schooling in the Plyer V. Doe. The enactment helps in providing access to free public education to both the juveniles of native U.S. citizens and undocumented persons. Therefore, kids from these families ought to have free education to promote the country’s literacy level and enhance equality.

 

 

 

Works Cited

Blume, Grant. “Funding postsecondary education for undocumented students in the United States.” Libraries Test Journal 1.1 (2011): 36-55. Retrieved from: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwii0t3gisvaAhUP3VMKHc8cAs0QFggqMAA&url=https%3A%2F%2Fdepts.washington.edu%2Fesreview%2Fwordpress%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2012%2F12%2FESR-2011-Research-Funding-Postsecondary-Education-for-Undocumented-Students.pdf&usg=AOvVaw2fA1N8M1f-P9Xt56Ew_h44

Davidson, Theresa, and Karlye Burson. “Keep those kids out: Nativism and attitudes toward access to public education for the children of undocumented immigrants.” Journal of Latinos and Education 16.1 (2017): 41-50. Retrieved from: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15348431.2016.1179189

Lad, Kaetlyn, and Désirée Braganza. “Increasing knowledge related to the experiences of undocumented immigrants in public schools.” Educational Leadership and Administration 24 (2013): 1. Retrieved from: search.proquest.com/openview/d003821d987b352466f020457fe5ca53/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=2032315

Lindsey, Kevin. “Access to education: challenges and opportunities for immigrant students.” (2013). Retrieved from: oppenheimer.mcgill.ca/IMG/pdf/First_Focus_-_Access_to_Education_-_Challenges_and_Opportunities_for_Immigrant_Students.pdf

Walsh, Amanda M. “Around the World: Illegal Immigrants and the Cost of Higher Education in the UK.” Child. Legal Rts. J. 33 (2013): 207. Retrieved from: heinonline.org/hol-cgi-bin/get_pdf.cgi?handle=hein.journals/clrj33&section=15