Ecology Essays on Examination of Atmospheric Heating and Circulation

Global Patterns of Atmospheric Heating and Circulation

            The patterns of atmospheric heating and circulation across the world perform based on the three cell technique, which asserts that there are three cells located between the equator and the north and south poles of Earth. The first cell is the polar cell, which functions across the latitudes of 60 degrees to 90 degrees. Second is the Ferrel cell, which functions across the latitudes of 30 degrees and 60 degrees. Last is the Hadley cell, which functions across the latitudes of 0 degrees to 30 degrees.  Since the Hadley cell executes the trade winds, it begins with air that is slightly warm which elevates to the equator in areas with low pressure to the point it settles in areas qith high pressure.  For the polar cell, which executes the polar easterlies in lower altitudes, warm air moves up and shifts to higher altitudes, whereby cool air settles because of high pressure. Finally, the Ferrel is multifaceted. It has warm air rising in the higher latitudes close to the polar cell and colon when it shifts to lower latitudes and settling in regions with high pressure in the lower latitudes close to the Hadley cell.

Based on the above description, higher precipitation in the tropical regions results from warm air originating from the two hemispheres interweaving in the inter-tropical convergence areas and the rise of this air because of low pressure, which leads to convection in the atmospheres. In temperate regions, high precipitation happens due to numerous fronts, which include cold fronts, warm fronts, systems that have low pressure, and stationary fronts. In the tropical zone, low precipitation can be instigated by prevailing and warm winds that are obstructed by mountain ranges because the mountains make the moisture in the winds to settle on the mountainside that is obstructing the winds as rain. Consequently, the other side is left in low precipitation.

To sum it up, The patterns of atmospheric heating and circulation across the world perform based on the three cell technique, which asserts that there are three cells located between the equator and the north and south poles of Earth. The higher precipitation in the tropical regions results from warm air originating from the two hemispheres interweaving in the inter-tropical convergence areas and the rise of this air because of law pressure, which leads to convection in the atmospheres.  In temperate regions, high precipitation happens due to numerous fronts, which includes cold fronts, warm fronts, systems that have low pressure, and stationary fronts. These are the mechanics that produce high precipitation in the tropics and temperate latitudes.

Illustration of Highly Seasonal Rainfall in the Tropical Dry Forest and Tropical Savanna Biomes Due to Atmospheric Circulation and Seasonal Changes in the Sun’s Orientation to Earth

            The pressure systems across the world have a key function in the geographic supply of precipitation. The worldwide pressure system has an impact on the association between the supply of precipitation and pressure patterns. Further, the biomes of tropical savannas and tropical dry forests relate to their respective climatic regions. The geographical location of the dry forest makes it climate to be vastly different from that of the rain forest. The tropical dry forest has both wet and dry seasons; however, the rain experienced in these zones is less than that in the rainforest. In addition, the tropical savannas also have changing wet and dry seasons similar to the tropical dry forests with the exception that grasslands are dominant in this zone.

The geographical region that gets most of the daylight directly is the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The region gets direct sunlight and as result the air rises unsteadily and makes the pressure to reduce. Ultimately, this makes the ITCZ a region of low pressure due to the high temperatures and the unstable nature of air once it rises, cools, and condenses to form clouds, which leads to precipitations. The shifting of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) has an impact on the patterns of seasonal precipitation since the ITCZ is constantly in a region where the sun is situated directly overhead. During the summertime, the sun is directly situated overhead in the tropics. Further, the shifting of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) has an impact on the patterns of seasonal precipitation in the regions of tropical climates where the sun is not directly overhead the regions of high pressure and are not beneficial to the production of clouds; therefore, they cannot lead to precipitation.

The regions where the sun is not overhead are referred to as doldrums and are comprised of the north and the south of Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone because they shift the doldrums seasonally parallel and are the cause of dry season in the tropical regions. This illustrates the nature of the excessive rainfall in the tropical monsoon and tropical rainforest Africa since they are nearby the equator. As such, they are nearby the ITCZ in most parts of the year and this favors the formation of clouds and hence rainfall. Due to their geographical positions on either side of the rainforest, the dry and west forests are under the ITCZ for a longer duration than the savannahs that are situated in the northern hemisphere, which is north of the dry forests, and the southern hemisphere, which is south of the dry forests.

The savanna climate is regarded as opposite the typical weather experienced in the rainforest and monsoon, which is the Dry/Wet climate.  The rain experienced in the savanna climate is also seasonal but is significantly less during the low season when it experiences dry conditions. The geographical position is one of the features that affect rain in dry forests and the savanna. In addition, there are other variables that may have an impact on rain in those regions like ocean currents and rain shadows.

The worldwide pressure system affects the association between the supply of precipitation and pressure patterns. The geographical region that gets most of the daylight directly is the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The ITCZ is a region of low pressure due to the high temperatures and the unstable nature of air once it rises, cools, and condenses to form clouds, which leads to precipitations. The regions where the sun is not overhead are referred to as doldrums and are comprised of the north and the south of Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone because they shift the doldrums seasonally parallel and are the cause of dry season in the tropical regions. Based on this, the savanna climate is regarded as opposite the typical weather experienced in the rainforest and monsoon, which is the Dry/Wet climate.