Do Students with Effective Time Management Skills Perform Better?

TASK ONE

Essay Question: Do students with effective time management skills achieve great?
FOR + AGAINST –
Time management is a strong predictor of academic performance (Kitsantas, 2008, p60). Students with excellent time management skill perform higher than their counterparts with poor skills. The ability to manage time effectively is not associated with academic performance. Although time management training enhance time management behaviors including planning tasks, setting goals, making to-do lists, and prioritizing, there is no significant evidence of these components effect on academic performance (Claessens et al., 2005, p270).
Self-regulated learning (SRL), which features various components including time management, is correlated to academic performance. Also, students who have other obligations outside school like work have better time management skills, hence higher performance (Thibodeaux et al., 2017, p28). Self-regulated learning does not predict academic outcomes. Nonetheless, self-regulated students tend to exhibit high intrinsic motivation and low performance anxiety (Virtanen et al., 2013, p31).
   

 

TASK TWO

2.1 My Reformulated Thesis:

This essay will argue that effective time management boosts students’ performance even though some studies have found no significant correlation.

2.2 Main Ideas

The main ideas I will discuss in my essay are:

  1. Time management and self-regulated learning literature
  2. The influence of time management on academic performance
  3. The role of self-regulation in student performance
  4. Studies with inconsistent findings on the impact of time management and self-regulation on academic performance

2.3 Topic sentences for the main ideas

TS1: Time management and self-regulation have been widely documented in the context of their impact of performance outcomes.
TS2: Various studies have demonstrated how students with excellent time management skills perform higher than their counterparts.
TS3: Self-regulation, with time management  as its component, has also shown to be a strong predictor of student’s performance
TS4: There are, however, studies that have contradicting results on the link between time management and academic performance

 

TASK THREE

References

Claessens, Brigitte,J.C., Eerde, van, Wendelien, Rutte, Christel,G. and Roe,Robert,A. (2005). A Review of the Time Management Literature. Emerald, 36 (2), 255-276.

Fauzi, A. and Widjajanti, Djamilah, Bondan. (2018). Self-Regulated Learning: The Effect on Students’ Mathematics Achievement. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 1097 (1), 1-7.

Kitsantas, Anastasia, Winsler, Adam, and Huie, Faye. (2008). Self-Regulation and Ability Predictors of Academic Success during College: A Predictive Validity Study. Journal of Advanced Academics, 20 (1), 42-68.

Mercanlioglu, Cigdem. (2010). The Relationship of Time Management to Academic Performance of Master Level Students. International Journal of Business and Management Studies, 2 (1), 25-36.

Razali, Siti,noor asyikin, Mohd, Rusiman, Mohd, Saifullah,Gan,W.S. and Arbin, N. (2017).The Impact of Time Management on Students’ Academic Achievement. Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 995 (1), 1-7.

Richardson, Michelle,Abraham, Charles and Bond, Rod. (2012). Psychological Correlates of University Students’ Academic Performance: ASystematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 138 (2), 353-387.

Thibodeaux, Jordan, Deutsch, Aaron, Kitsantas, Anastasia, and Winsler,Adam. (2017). First-Year College Students’ Time Use: Relations with Self-Regulation and GPA. Journal of Advanced Academics, 28 (1), 5-27.

Virtanen, Paivi, Nevgi, Anne and Niemi, Hannele. (2013). Self-Regulation in Higher Education: Motivational, Regulational and Learning Strategies, and their Relationships to Study Success. Studies for the Learning Society, 3 (1-2), 20-36.

 

 

Do Students with Effective Time Management Skills Perform Better?

The recent decades have seen a growing recognition of the role of time management in the organizational literature. This subject has, however, been widely documented in the academic setting where time is believed to be an essential factor. Students, especially those in higher learning institutions, are believed to allocate more time on non-academic activities like employment and leisure, depriving their educational needs of attention. To optimize students’ productivity, academic institutions have focused on helping students to effectively plan and prioritize activities that enhance their education. Self-regulation, which features many components including time management skills, has also been emphasized in improving student’s performance. This move has prompted researchers to investigate the impact of time management skill on student’s performance. Although the research has generated mixed results, effective time management has shown to greatly boosts student’s performance.

Time management and self-regulation have been widely documented in the context of their impact of performance outcomes. Both theoretic and practical publications have attempted to show how people in organizations manage their time and how the two concepts (time management and self-regulation) can be improved for higher productivity. Although the subject of time management has gained prominence in the era of globalization, the subject dates back to the 1950s and 1960s when several scholars suggested ways of managing time at work (Claessens et al., 2005:256). Time management has been defined differently by numerous authors. However, the most referred to definition is that by Lakein (1973, cited in Claessens et al., 2005:262), who explained that time management is “the process of determining needs, setting goals to achieve these needs, prioritizing, and planning tasks required to achieve these goals”. Claessens et al. (2005:262) define time management as “behaviors that aim at achieving an effective use f time while performing certain goal-directed activities”. These behaviors include time assessment, planning, and monitoring. The concept of time management has been emphasized in the learning sphere where students face the challenge of planning and prioritizing behaviors that align with their academic goals. Various researchers including Mercanlioglu (2010:30) have demonstrated that students who exhibit the behaviors of time management tend to achieve higher. Self-regulation is another component that has attracted great scholarly attention due to its link to academic performance. Zimmerman (2008, cited in Thibodeaux et al., 2017:6) perceives self-regulation in terms of setting goals, strategic planning, monitoring performance, and using various learning strategies. On the other hand, Virtanen et al. (2013:25) list components of self-regulation as time management, self-management, persistency, self-assessment, and help-seeking strategies. Self-regulation is also linked to better academic performance.

Various studies have demonstrated how students with excellent time management skills perform higher than their counterparts. Kitsantas et al., (2008) conducted a study to determine how self-regulation and ability affect academic performance. The research involved 243 first year students in their first semester at a major mid-Atlantic university. Questionnaires were used to gather data and the participants’ GPA was accessed at the end of the first and second semesters (Ibid:50). When assessing the students’ performance at the end of the second semester, data revealed that time management and contributed significantly to the results. In another study, Razali et al. (2018) found similar results. The study featured 400 students from eight faculties of University Tun Hussein Onn (UTHM), Malaysia. It was found out that time management enhanced students’ performance (Razali et al., 2018:6). These studies reveal that students with effective time management skills are most likely to perform better than their counterparts.

Self-regulation, with time management as its component, has also shown to be a strong predictor of student’s performance. Thibodeaux et al. (2017) examined the relationship between time management and self regulation and academic performance. The study involved 589 first-year students from another major public university in the mid-Atlantic. It was found that self-regulated learning and time use had a significant influence on GPA. Further, Fauzi and Widjajanti (2018) investigated the effect of SRL on mathematics students. 11 journal articles were reviewed and it was revealed that students with excellent self-regulated skills were most likely to perform better in mathematics compared to their counterparts (Fauzi and Widjajanti, 2018:4). Since time management is a significant element of self-regulation, the results indicate that students’ performance greatly relies on time management skills.

There are, however, studies that have contradicting results on the link between time management and academic performance. In 2005, Claessens et al. conducted a literature review to provide an overview of time management. 32 empirical studies were analyzed. They revealed that although time management training enhances time management behaviors, no significant effect on productivity was identified (Claessens et al., 2005:264). In another study on self-regulation, Virtanen et al. (2013) examined 1248 Finnish students and found no positive link between SRL and academic success. Although Claessens et al. (2005) found no significant correlation between time management and academic performance, they revealed that time management training promotes behaviors that enable individuals to plan time effectively. These behaviors, which were discussed earlier, have been widely supported in the academic sector, demonstrating their significance on student’s performance. Therefore, students who are able to effectively plan their time are most likely to achieve academic success.

Time management, alongside self-regulation, is a powerful predictor of academic performance. The discussed studies indicate that time management skills are essential for academic performance. Although two studies gave contradicting results, one of the studies indicated that time management training instills time management behaviors, which are emphasized in schools due to their positive influence on performance. This illustrates that students with excellent skills of managing time are most likely to perform better than those who lack the skills. These findings imply that school administrations should invest more in time management training to enable students to achieve their academic goals. The practice can also be adopted in other organizations.

 

Works Cited

Claessens, Brigitte,J.C., Eerde, van, Wendelien, Rutte, Christel,G. and Roe,Robert,A. (2005). A Review of the Time Management Literature. Emerald, 36 (2), 255-276.

Fauzi, A. and Widjajanti, Djamilah, Bondan. (2018). Self-Regulated Learning: The Effect on Students’ Mathematics Achievement. Journal of Physics Conference Series, 1097 (1), 1-7.

Kitsantas, Anastasia, Winsler, Adam, and Huie, Faye. (2008). Self-Regulation and Ability Predictors of Academic Success during College: A Predictive Validity Study. Journal of Advanced Academics, 20 (1), 42-68.

Mercanlioglu, Cigdem. (2010). The Relationship of Time Management to Academic Performance of Master Level Students. International Journal of Business and Management Studies, 2 (1), 25-36.

Razali, Siti,noor asyikin, Mohd, Rusiman, Mohd, Saifullah,Gan,W.S. and Arbin, N. (2017).The Impact of Time Management on Students’ Academic Achievement. Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 995 (1), 1-7.

Richardson, Michelle,Abraham, Charles and Bond, Rod. (2012). Psychological Correlates of University Students’ Academic Performance: ASystematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 138 (2), 353-387.

Thibodeaux, Jordan, Deutsch, Aaron, Kitsantas, Anastasia, and Winsler,Adam. (2017). First-Year College Students’ Time Use: Relations with Self-Regulation and GPA. Journal of Advanced Academics, 28 (1), 5-27.

Virtanen, Paivi, Nevgi, Anne and Niemi, Hannele. (2013). Self-Regulation in Higher Education: Motivational, Regulational and Learning Strategies, and their Relationships to Study Success. Studies for the Learning Society, 3 (1-2), 20-