Composition Essay: Should all Learning Institutions introduce a Dress Code for their teachers?

Should all Learning Institutions introduce a Dress Code for their teachers?

Introduction

            Dress codes for teachers and educators, or lack thereof, differ by districts and even learning institutions. In the past, there have been widespread complaints about teachers putting on inappropriate clothes that distract the attentions of students and their colleagues. These complaints have come about since a large majority of learning institutions does not impose a strict dress code on their educators. As a result, many teachers have abused this privilege by dressing the way they please. There have been cases of female teachers wearing miniskirts to class, blouses that expose their breasts or other dresses that outline their cleavage. In this regard, this research paper will argue that all learning institutions should introduce a dress code for their educators to ensure that they wear appropriate clothes while at work. It will argue that teachers who dress decently are more successful at what they do, demonstrate a good example to their students and are highly respected and regarded by their students and community. In addition, schools with a dress code have higher profile within the community. 

Annotated Bibliography

Wiest, L. R. (1999). Practicing what they teach: Should teachers “do as they say”? The Clearing House, 72(5), 264-268. 

In this article, Wiest explores one aspect of the student-teacher interconnections that plays an integral role in creating a desirable learning setting: the extent to which teacher behaviors that are discernible to students match expected student behaviors for similar situations. The author discusses that teachers convey their beliefs to their students through the way they behave. Consequently, the students will take up these beliefs. This is a peer-reviewed article, meaning that it has been read and certified to be true by a panel of highly qualified scholars. Therefore, it is highly credible. Lynda Wiest earned a PhD in 1996 and is currently a professor of Mathematics Education at University of Nevada. This indicates that this article is of high quality. It is relevant for the research paper since it encourages teachers to behave appropriately in class since their students copy what they do. Thus, for students to dress fittingly teachers must also wear decent clothes. This calls for the establishment of a dress code.

Simmons, B. J. (1996). Teachers should dress for success. The Clearing House, 69(5), 297.

In this article, Simmons emphasizes the fact that the way a teacher dresses sends a strong message about who he/she is, what his/her goals are as well as how much students can get with. In addition, she adds that teachers should put on decent clothes if they are to earn respect. Betty Simmons is an associate professor of education at Longwood College. She is qualified enough to come to these conclusion since she has teaching experience in addition to her high academic achievement. Therefore, this article is credible. The fact that it was published by ‘The Clearing House’, an academic journal dedicated for educational ideas, strategies and issues, shows that it is of high quality. This article is extremely relevant for the research paper since it clearly points out the need for educators to dress decently. In essence, it is encouraging school administrators to introduce dress codes for their teachers.

Workman, J. E., & Freeburg, B. W. (2010). Teacher dress codes in employee handbooks: An analysis. Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, 102(3), 9-15.

This study analyzed dress codes for teachers to determine the dress items that expressed role distance and role embracement. The researchers identified three codes: conventional, casual and immodest. Their results showed that conventional (appropriate professional) dress portrayed role embracement while casual and immodest dress demonstrated role distance. This was a primary research article, which implies that the researchers conducted an actual study that followed all conventions. Therefore, its findings are credible. Considering that it was peer reviewed, it is also of high quality. In the same breath, both Workman and Freeburg are PhD holders, a further testament to the quality of this article. The finding that proper dressing portrays role embracement emphasizes the importance of introducing dress codes for teachers. Teachers that wear decent and professional clothing are highly regarded by students and parents.

Freeburg, B. W., Workman, J. E., Arnett, S. E., & Robinson, J. R. (2011). Rationales and norms for teacher dress codes: A review of employee handbooks. National Association of Secondary School Principals. NASSP Bulletin, 95(1), 31-45. 

Freeburg et al. conducted this study to investigate what dress norms and associated rationales are found in dress policies for teachers. In total, 102 schools that had a dress code were investigated. Their findings showed that most schools introduced a dress norm in order to project a positive image within the society. In the discussion, the researchers write that dress codes have a considerable impact on the learning environment. This is a conventional research experiment that collected and reported on primary data. Therefore, it is credible since the researchers are reporting on what they found first hand. The study was conducted by four practicing scholars at the University of Southern Illinois, all of whom boast an extensive research background. This shows that this article is of high quality. Information from this article is useful since outlines how dress codes can raise the profile of a learning institution in the community.

Campbell, S. E. (2006). Improving school security through dress codes: A unique opportunity for FCS. Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, 98(2), 25.

In this article, Campbell shows how dress codes improves security in schools since they reduce violence, enhance behavior and reduce instances of sexual harassment. She writes that the ultimate goal for dress code is to promote a positive school climate, ensure safety, promote respect for self and others and provide a sense of community. The article generalizes for both students and teachers. These assertions support the proposed research paper thesis that schools have dress codes for their teachers. Sally Campbell has many years of experience teaching at Pinckneyville High School. This implies that her arguments have arisen from what she has witnessed. Therefore, this article can be considered credible. Furthermore, this article was first featured by the American Association of Family and Consumer Services before it was published its corresponding scholarly journal. This demonstrates that it is of high quality.

Roach, K. D. (1997). Effects of graduate teaching assistant attire on student learning, misbehaviors, and ratings of instruction. Communication Quarterly, 45(3), 125-141.

This study investigated the impact of teaching assistant dressing in a university classroom. Results showed that there is a significant relationship between tutor dress and student affective learning, cognitive learning and instruction ratings. Further analysis of variance demonstrated significant differences by levels of dressing. In addition, it was found that students misbehaviors were less likely for teachers wearing highly professional attires. Even though this article emphasizes that a teacher’s attire is not the most important factor influencing classroom variables, it at least has a significant impact. It thus supports the opinion that dress codes for educators are necessary in all learning institutions. This article is of high quality since it has been peer reviewed by a panel of eminent scholars. In addition, it is credible since it was conducted a practicing professor who has wide experience in communication research.

Kiracofe, C. (2010). Can Teachers Really Wear that to School? Religious Garb in Public Classrooms. Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas, 83(3), 80-83.

This article looks at the regulation of teacher dress and its intersection with the American Constitution, the civil rights act and various state religious garb regulations. In general, it says that the courts have not made any major rulings that compel schools to introduce dress codes for their teachers. However, the authors have discussed several legal cases related to schools and educators who were accused of dressing inappropriately. This article was published by Taylor and Francis, one of the most highly regarded publishers of academic books and journals. This is an indication that it is credible. Christine Kiracofe is an experienced researcher specializing in education law and finance. This implies that her works are of quality. Even though this article does not call for the introduction of dress codes for teachers, it shows how the lack of these policies can lead to legal conflicts. To avoid teacher-school disputes that arise from perceived inappropriate dressing, it is advisable that institutions have dress codes.

Carr, D. L., Davies, T. L., & Lavin, A. M. (2010). The Impact of Instructor Attire on College Student Satisfaction. College Student Journal, 44(1), 101-111.

This study investigates whether the attire of faculty members has an effect on the satisfaction levels of college students. Its results show that students had a higher opinion of their learning experience (including reputation of the school, value of education and quality of education) when the model instructor was dressed professionally. Students also had high hopes for finding a job (since they believe they are better prepared) when the instructor dresses decently. These findings appear to support my proposed research paper’s thesis that schools should introduce dress codes for teachers because it increases the satisfaction levels of students. The findings of this article are of high quality since they have been confirmed by a panel of academicians (it has been peer reviewed). They are also credible since the researchers collected primary data for analysis.

Carr, D., Davies, T., & Lavin, A. (2009). The Effect of Business Faculty Attire On Student Perceptions Of The Quality Of Instruction And Program Quality. College Student Journal, 43(1), 45-55.

Carr et al. discuss that how professors behave and dress is just as important to a student as the content they are given. In this study, they found that students generally have a favorable attitude towards a professor who dresses professionally. This perception has a carryover effect since it leaves the students with a positive opinion about the course, program and institution. This enhances their chances of academic success. In essence, these findings show that educators should dress professionally. In the event of an absence of a dress code for teachers within a school, it should be introduced. This discussion supports the research paper’s argument. The quality of the article is demonstrated in the fact that it has been published by an academic journal. Its findings can be considered credible since the article was peer reviewed before publication.

Freeburg, B., & Workman, J. E. (2010). Media Frames regarding Teacher Dress: Implications for Career and Technical Education Teacher Preparation. Career and Technical Education Research, 35(1), 29-45.

This article analyzed 28 newspaper stories and editorials related to teachers’ dress codes. In general, it observed that most stories advocated for dress codes since the attire of educators affects their identity and their capacity to mentor students. The authors call for the establishment of dress and appearance standards to help teachers wear suitable clothes. In this regard, this article supports the proposed research paper’s argument for introduction of dressing policies in all learning institutions. During the data collection process, the researchers discovered that most of the newspaper articles were written by administrators and members of the board. This indicates that they had a credible basis when they recommended the establishment of the codes. As discussed earlier, Freeburg and Workman are highly experienced in this field. Presently, they are professors based at the University of Southern Illinois. Therefore, this article is of high quality.

Waggoner, C. (2002). Blue denim blues. School Administrator, 59(2), 66-68.

At the time of writing this article, Waggoner was a superintendent at the Havana Community Unified School District. He has worked in this capacity for a long time. Therefore, his words are credible. In a straightforwardly manner, Waggoner argues for the introduction of teachers dress code, writing that, in any given day, the teacher is the most professional person that students see. Thus, there is a need for students and the community to view teachers as professionals, as opposed to their friends who dress just like them. Moreover, he writes that since teachers go to interview while dressed professionally, they should maintain those standards throughout. Waggoner’s argument is similar to the thesis of the research paper. School Administrator is an award-winning magazine published every month. It is chiefly meant for superintendents of public school districts throughout the United States. Waggoner’s article appearance in this magazine suggests that it was considered to be of high quality by the editors.

Lightstone, K., Francis, R., & Kocum, L. (2011). University faculty style of dress and students’ perception of instructor credibility. International Journal of Business and Social Science2(15), 15-22.

This study examined the perceptions of university students in terms of credibility, likeability and character towards their professors based on what they wear. Students were shown different professors wearing formal and informal clothes. To ensure that the educators were judged based on their dressing alone, the researchers covered their faces. Results showed that professors in formal attire were considered more credible than those who wore less formal clothes. It was also found that female formally dressed educators were not considered less credible than their male counterparts. This is a clear indicator that all teachers who dress appropriately for classrooms are perceived to be credible. In essence, this article supports my assertion that learning institutions should have dress codes for their teachers if they are to appear credible. This article is of high quality and convincing since it has been peer reviewed.

References

Campbell, S. E. (2006). Improving school security through dress codes: A unique opportunity for FCS. Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, 98(2), 25.

Carr, D. L., Davies, T. L., & Lavin, A. M. (2010). The Impact of Instructor Attire on College Student Satisfaction. College Student Journal, 44(1), 101-111.

Carr, D., Davies, T., & Lavin, A. (2009). The Effect of Business Faculty Attire On Student Perceptions Of The Quality Of Instruction And Program Quality. College Student Journal, 43(1), 45-55.

Freeburg, B. W., Workman, J. E., Arnett, S. E., & Robinson, J. R. (2011). Rationales and norms for teacher dress codes: A review of employee handbooks. National Association of Secondary School Principals. NASSP Bulletin, 95(1), 31-45. 

Freeburg, B., & Workman, J. E. (2010). Media Frames regarding Teacher Dress: Implications for Career and Technical Education Teacher Preparation. Career and Technical Education Research, 35(1), 29-45.

Kiracofe, C. (2010). Can Teachers Really Wear that to School? Religious Garb in Public Classrooms. Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas, 83(3), 80-83.

Lightstone, K., Francis, R., & Kocum, L. (2011). University faculty style of dress and students’ perception of instructor credibility. International Journal of Business and Social Science2(15), 15-22.

Roach, K. D. (1997). Effects of graduate teaching assistant attire on student learning, misbehaviors, and ratings of instruction. Communication Quarterly, 45(3), 125-141.

Simmons, B. J. (1996). Teachers should dress for success. The Clearing House, 69(5), 297.

Waggoner, C. (2002). Blue denim blues. School Administrator, 59(2), 66-68.

Wiest, L. R. (1999). Practicing what they teach: Should teachers “do as they say”? The Clearing House, 72(5), 264-268.

Workman, J. E., & Freeburg, B. W. (2010). Teacher dress codes in employee handbooks: An analysis. Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, 102(3), 9-15.